Perception is Embodied (but what does that mean?)

Of course, we all know that each of us sees things a little differently. For example, if you’re lactose intolerant (or a vegan), dairy ice cream looks very different to you than it might to someone else. If you were bit by a dog as a child, then you don’t see them as the sameContinue reading “Perception is Embodied (but what does that mean?)”

what is bilateral stimulation?

In 1987, Dr. Francine Shapiro went for a walk. As she walked, she noticed that her eyes were moving from side to side, and that some disturbing thoughts she’d been having were easing. She said: “The thoughts weren’t as bothersome. I wanted to see if it would work if it was deliberate, so I broughtContinue reading “what is bilateral stimulation?”

things not to apologize for:

to your movement/wellness professional (yoga teacher, personal trainer, coach, etc.) I wrote this post the other day after a few sessions with clients who have a deep-seated apology habit– even when there’s nothing to apologize for. I always express that there’s no need to apologize, and that my job is to help this process feelContinue reading “things not to apologize for:”

do isometric contractions freak you out? here’s what to do.

Isometric contractions are a popular (and powerful) choice for mobility & strength work. They’re incredibly useful as a tool to both expand and strengthen ranges of motion. They teach the brain to recognize and respond to areas of our body where we may have limited awareness. They’re a brilliant strategy for stabilizing joints. And theyContinue reading “do isometric contractions freak you out? here’s what to do.”

your hackable brain: why knowing yourself is more important than ever

The other day I was listening to a podcast. The “commercial break” was 30 seconds of “the sounds of nature.” As I listened to the sounds of a woodland scene (birds, trees, wind), I felt my body softening and relaxing unconsciously. I didn’t need to make anything happen– it happened naturally. Then, the sounds faded,Continue reading “your hackable brain: why knowing yourself is more important than ever”

mindful anger

What’s your capacity to be embodied, present and engaged with anger? Before we jump into this topic, it might be helpful to reflect for a moment on your relationship with anger: When you read or hear the word “anger,” what do you notice in your body? In your personal history, what has happened when youContinue reading “mindful anger”

they handed me a french horn: (it’s not too late to be who you wish you had been)

“There is an inner wholeness that presses its still unfilled claims upon us.” Emma Jung My one and only childhood encounter with musical instruction happened at the age of 9. My classmates and I were filed into a small room where a visibly irritated and tired teacher handed each of us a musical instrument. WhenContinue reading “they handed me a french horn: (it’s not too late to be who you wish you had been)”

6 ways that movement helps support mental health

(There are definitely more, but 6 is a nice number to start with!) Endorphins. Movement releases “feel-good” hormones like seratonin, endorphins, dopamine & norepinephrine (adrenaline). You really can get a natural high. If you’re moving in synchronicity with other people, socializing, or outdoors, you may get an additional dose of these! Improves the mind-body connection.Continue reading “6 ways that movement helps support mental health”

HRV: when you can’t hear what your body’s saying, turn on the closed captions

Like many of you, I have a morning ritual. I wake up, feed the dogs, make my coffee, and sit down with my phone– not to start my social media scroll (that will come later)– but to take my heart rate variability (HRV) measurement. HRV is a super easy way to take a look atContinue reading “HRV: when you can’t hear what your body’s saying, turn on the closed captions”

balancing the allostatic load

One of the things that brings me joy, that makes me feel alive, powerful, and free, is physical training. I love to sweat, to move, to swing heavy things. It helps me to complete the stress cycle, reinforces my sense of agency and strength, and (because I am often outside), gives me a chance toContinue reading “balancing the allostatic load”