mindful anger

What’s your capacity to be embodied, present and engaged with anger? Before we jump into this topic, it might be helpful to reflect for a moment on your relationship with anger: When you read or hear the word “anger,” what do you notice in your body? In your personal history, what has happened when youContinue reading “mindful anger”

“can’t you just…”

Last week, one of my clients was telling me about her past experience with a yoga teacher. “She was young, thin, her body could do everything, and she was just trying to push my body into different positions, like, ‘can’t you just do this,’ and it wasn’t working at all…” In that moment, not onlyContinue reading ““can’t you just…””

6 ways that movement helps support mental health

(There are definitely more, but 6 is a nice number to start with!) Endorphins. Movement releases “feel-good” hormones like seratonin, endorphins, dopamine & norepinephrine (adrenaline). You really can get a natural high. If you’re moving in synchronicity with other people, socializing, or outdoors, you may get an additional dose of these! Improves the mind-body connection.Continue reading “6 ways that movement helps support mental health”

tension holds us together

What do you feel when you read the word “tension?” When we speak or hear about tension in the context of a yoga class or a massage treatment, we might think of tension as something to be eradicated, soothed away, released, dissolved. We’re encouraged to smooth our forehead, relax our jaw, soften our shoulders. TheContinue reading “tension holds us together”

neuroception, embodiment & how to be with others in a nonreactive way

As I’m writing this, my dogs are barking fiercely: the lawn maintenance company is trimming some hedges around the house, and as the workers move past each window, it is FULL RED ALERT CRISIS TIME. You couldn’t have a conversation in here if you tried. This ability to perceive danger or threat is called neuroception.Continue reading “neuroception, embodiment & how to be with others in a nonreactive way”

a basic understanding of trauma

It seems like trauma is trending lately– we hear more about it in mainstream news, and it feels as though there’s much less stigma around mental health issues. Many people I know are comfortable talking about their own therapy, their past (and present) trauma, and many yoga teachers, personal trainers and movement coaches are learningContinue reading “a basic understanding of trauma”